Need a plateau buster? Men and women: Increase your weight!

Men and women lifting hand weights
Contrary to popular belief, adding a couple of extra pounds on your hands weight won’t lead you to bulk up

Have you noticed that the hand weights that used to challenge you and leave you pleasantly sore after a session are feeling a little underwhelming? If yes, it may be time to increase your weight.

Different goals for men and women
My male clients, for the most part, greet this suggestion with open arms. Women on the otherhand are often uneasy with the suggestion of lifting more weight, suspicious that it will cause them to bulk up.

To these clients (and women alike), let me assure you that a couple of extra pounds on your hand weights will only help you with toning and increasing muscle definition (not bulk), which helps one burn more calories at rest (and lead to weight loss and a more toned and athletic body).

What if I do want to bulk up?
If your goal it to increase muscle mass, this can be done…and it is a purposeful program (coupled with a meal plan that increases caloric intake substatially). Before I embark on any at-home program with a client, we discuss your goals and any initial questions (and any that come up along the way).

If you answer yes to any of the following, it may be time to talk to your trainer about increasing your hand weights:

  • Your progress plateaued
  • You have never increased your hand weight
  • Your weights are no longer a challenge to lift
  • You can do endless reps

Interested in at-home training and meal plans, contact HomeBodyFit to achieve your fitness goals!

 

 

Your Complete Guide To Skullcrushers!

by Bill Geiger
BodyBuilding.com

your-complete-guide-to-skullcrushers-graphics-neutral-grip-dumbbell-skullcrusher

Contrary to what the name might suggest, skullcrushers won’t send you screaming to the ER—at least when done right. They can, however, help you build massive triceps. Here’s everything you need to know about this popular exercise!

Most exercises have rather literal names: A single-arm overhead dumbbell extension describes the movement pretty well, after all. A few others, however, are named for the part of the body they’ll break if you lose control. In this class we have skullcrushers.

Skullcrushers are actually a family of single-joint triceps exercises, not necessarily just one exercise, because there are so many ways to do them. You can use almost any kind of implement—dumbbells, barbell, EZ-bar, or cables—as well as a variety of angled benches. Each variation provides a slightly different feel and effect, so I’ll guide you through the most popular.

What all skullcrusher variations have in common is simple: elbow extension. The upper arms are generally locked in a position perpendicular to the body, which means both the long and lateral triceps heads—the two biggest—are called into play. As you increase the angle of the bench (i.e., use a more inclined bench), the upper arms move closer to an overhead position, so more of the work falls on your triceps long head. Doing the movement on a decline bench reduces the long-head involvement, so more of the emphasis falls on the lateral triceps head.

CLICK HERE FOR SIX TIPS FOR CRUSHING THE SKULLCRUSHER

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